Skip to content

Learn about the history of Aleut Ikyaks this Saturday

September 16, 2010

FREE and Open to anyone to attend!

9am – Noon,  Saturday September 18

CWB Pavilion

Instructor Corey Freedman begins his Aleut Ikyak class with a really interesting and engaging talk about the history of Baidarkas. Join Corey and his students for a free talk. It just might inspire you to build your own Baidarka! Keep an eye open for our 2011 schedule, which will be released in December.

Some information about Aleut Ikyaks and the workshop offered by CWB that allows you to build your very own:

The Aleut Ikyak, also widely known as the Baidarka, has been used for thousands of years as the primary method of transportation in the Aleutian Islands. It is the acme of Arctic Native design. Build your own boat, 17′ long and weighing 25 to 40 pounds and designed to fit your skill level and body type. The boats will be built primarily of yellow and red cedar with all joinery pegged and lashed – no metal fastenings or glues. The skin will be made from 10-14 oz. ballistic nylon cloth with a resin coating that provides waterproofing and translucence. You do not need woodworking experience; just come equipped with enthusiasm!

Under the guidance of a leading authority in the revival of this lost art, you will build a seagoing, traditional Aleut Ikyak, also widely known as a Baidarka. The general design is at least two thousand years old, with some eighteenth century modifications at the instigation of Siberian sea otter fur traders, who for years dominated the natives. Just as the Aleuts did, you will craft a kayak for your own skill level, style, and body type using authentic native methods and designs. Even your aesthetic sense can be incorporated as you design your own lines. Like the boats of the natives, yours will be individual and different from others.

Advantages: We believe the quality and performance of these kayaks are unmatched. The weight is well below that of most kayaks on the market today, a significant factor in performance and portability. The structural flexibility is part of the secret to the performance of these boats, and plays an important role in their durability due to the shock-absorbing quality. More than 800 Aleut kayaks have been built under our instruction, most of which are still active on the skinboat scene.

Specifications: The skeleton consists of selected wood species, primarily western red cedar. The 44 Yellow Cedar frames are steam bent. All joinery is pegged and lashed, with no glue or metal fasteners. The skin is 8 to 12 ounce ballistic woven nylon for maximum strength and flexibility. A coating of highly abrasion resistant resin provides waterproofing and creates a uniquely attractive translucent appearance. Average length is about 17 feet and weights range from 26 to 33 pounds. Micro-light models can be built under 20 pounds.

Workshop Information:

Kayak Building:Aleut Ikyak (Baidarka)

Instructor: Corey Freedman
Session 3: September 18 – 26
Time: 9 am – 5 pm (Saturday – Sunday)
Cost: $1,200 members / $1,400 non-members

The Aleut Ikyak, also widely known as the Baidarka, has been used for thousands of years as the primary method of transportation in the Aleutian Islands. It is the acme of Arctic Native design. Build your own boat, designed to fit your skill level and body type. The boats are built primarily of yellow and red cedar with all joinery pegged and lashed – no metal fastenings or glues. The skin is made from 10-14 oz. ballistic nylon cloth with a resin coating that provides waterproofing and translucence. You do not need woodworking experience; just come equipped with enthusiasm!

There are no remaining Aleut Ikyak classes at CWB for 2010. Stay tuned for next year’s schedule – available in December.

Learn more about Corey and Aleut Ikyaks:  www.skinboats.org

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: